• Book Cover-Recovering
    Reclaiming Your Addicted Brain Reclaiming Your Addicted Brain

    Reclaiming Your Addicted Brain

Reclaiming Your Addicted Brain

Reclaiming Your Addicted Brain   (1/3 off this week!) Newest work from Roger’s pen with co-author Irwin Morse explores the “How” of coming back from having an addicted brain. The story follows George, an alcoholic and sex addict, through some of his acting out and mental processing as an addict.  The story then turns to the process of his recovery.  Along the way clinical commentary accompanies the narrative, shedding light and understanding on the process.  The illustrations provide those still in the struggle of profound examples of their own addictive behaviors.  The illustrations are followed by clear “How To” steps […]

  • relapse quote
    Self Inflicted Wounds Self Inflicted Wounds

    Self Inflicted Wounds

Self Inflicted Wounds

If we did autopsies on relapses, the most prevalent listed finding would be: Relapse due to self inflicted wounds.  Self inflicted wounds occur when we focus the considerable self destructive weapons in our arsenal, to hurt and maim, our oldest, truest friend, ourselves.  One addict explains, “I got all up in my head,” preceding the damage report. Who hasn’t observed a friend having a world class pity party, on his way to acting out. These are the self inflicted wounds. Many deal with issues not of their own making, unrequested trauma, genetic or cultural issues not of their choosing. These […]

  • choice
    About Choice and Addiction About Choice and Addiction

    About Choice and Addiction

About Choice and Addiction

When the conversation turns to addiction, “Why don’t they just quit?” is often the first question asked. New research is indicating that addicts and alcoholics may be able to do just that: choose their way out of their addictive behaviors, with the right set of incentives and consequences. The understanding of addiction and best treatment practices has come along way in the last 80 years. In the ’30s and ’40s alcoholics and drug misusers were thought of as moral derelicts. Treatment consisted of long visits to the sanitarium where little help was offered other than an atmosphere of abstinence. It was […]

  • fat lady3
    Recovery, It Ain’t Over ‘Til It’s Over Recovery, It Ain’t Over ‘Til It’s Over

    Recovery, It Ain’t Over ‘Til It’s Over

Recovery, It Ain’t Over ‘Til It’s Over

Yogi Berra taught us all that it ain’t over til the fat lady sings!  The process of recovery has a similar final act. To the general public, the term “recovery” is seen as “someone who is trying to stop using alcohol or other drugs.” (NCADD)   It then follows that the process of recovery is accomplished when we stop using.  Achieving the thing we call sobriety. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) recently undertook to quantify what the process of recovery might look like.  Their work yielded this definition:  “Recovery is a process of change whereby individuals […]

  • movie set
    Living on a Movie Set Living on a Movie Set

    Living on a Movie Set

Living on a Movie Set

Being an addict is like living life on a movie set.  It looks real, feels real, but is only a shell, a facade that is far from the parameters of reality.  The condemning problem is that the addict doesn’t recognize it. In our minds the “set” is nothing but real.  We act out our fantasy life within the view of all around us maintaining a blind eye to reality.  We are convinced they will stay “on script” no matter how outrageous our behavior becomes.  That is impossible, they don’t have the script, only we do, they are living in the […]

  • walking
    She walked through it… She walked through it…

    She walked through it…

She walked through it…

I visited with a friend the other day and she surprised me.  She had a very traumatic childhood and had struggled to manage her emotional life as an adult.  Rage was her number one tool of empowerment.  The rage gave her a sense of power but left her without friends or partners, she chased them all away. As we talked she recounted a story to me that in the past would have ended in rage that she handled in a very healthy way.  I marveled at her new skills and couldn’t help asking how she had accomplished it.  She said, […]

  • cemetary
    Sometimes it takes all we have, even our lives. Sometimes it takes all we have, even our lives.

    Sometimes it takes all we have, even our lives.

Sometimes it takes all we have, even our lives.

This letter to the editor from the Austin Chonicle tells an all too familiar story. Our addictions require an accounting, a settling up. They come at a cost, sometimes we don’t have enough to lose and our life is also required. It is one of the great tragedies of our times, and also, one of the realities. On Sunday, my friend of 24 years, Debbie, died in St. David’s South Austin Medical Center from a cocaine-related heart attack. She was 53 years old. Thirty-eight years of heroin, cocaine, and pills had taken their toll. She always thought it was OK […]